What should my employer do if I'm injured?

Page intro

Your employer has a number of obligations if you are injured at work, such as making sure you get the first aid you need, sending an Employer’s Initial Report of Injury (E1) form to the WCB within five days of being told about your injury and starting to determine if modified duties are available, which suit the restrictions of your injury.

Page content
Text

If you are injured at work, your employer must:

  • Make sure you get the first aid you need and arrange for transportation to a qualified health-care provider.
  • Fill out and send an Employer’s Initial Report of Injury (E1) form to the Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board (WCB) within five days of being told about your injury.
  • Keep an accurate record of your injury even if you don’t lose any time from work.
  • Co-operate with you, your care provider and the WCB to return you to work as soon as you are medically fit.
  • Make changes, if necessary and short of undue hardship (which is an action requiring unreasonable difficulties based on health, safety and/or financial considerations), to your workspace or to the work tasks you performed before your injury so that you can work while you recover.

Can my employer and I agree to not report my injury?

No. You and your employer are legally required to report to the WCB all injuries that need medical attention, even if you don’t miss any time at work. Any agreement to not report an injury is illegal.

Care providers are also required to report to the WCB every work injury they treat.

Does my employer have access to my injury claim information?

All employer and injured worker information is confidential. Under the The Workers’ Compensation Act, 2013, (the Act) you, your authorized representatives or, in the case of a death, your dependant(s) can get a copy of the claim record by making a request.

The Act also gives your employer the right to request a review of an appeal of a decision we have made on your claim and the right to receive information about our decision from your claim file for the purposes of an appeal. You will have to approve the release of this information to the employer by filling out a Consent to Release of Personal Information (TROI) form.

How it works:

  • We must send you a letter that tells you that your employer is appealing a decision. A copy of the information we will send to your employer will be in a package with the letter.
  • You have 15 business days from the date of our letter to tell us if there is information in the package that you do not want sent to your employer. Send us a letter explaining what information you do not want sent to your employer and why. Only information unrelated to your work injury is not relevant or used to make the decision.
  • If we do not get a letter from you, we will send the information to your employer after the 15 business days.
  • If you send us a letter, we will look at your concerns before we make a final decision. Then we will send you a second letter and a copy of what we are sending to your employer.
  • You have 15 business days from the date of our second letter to ask us to reconsider the information selected. Your employer will not receive any information until the second waiting period of 15 business days has passed.

After the final waiting period of 15 business days, we will consider any objections you have brought to our attention. We will let you know of changes we have made and forward the information to your employer.

Contact

Submit a form

Please send either a picture (JPEG) or a PDF document.